Redlyst

Brief

Redlyst was a strategic partnership between Coolfire Solutions and a private security company. They were looking to leverage Coolfire's Ronin platform for a Persons of Interest (POI) management app. The goal was to digitize the Redlyst operation to reduce response times to threats, increase situational awareness, and automate tracking and alerts for suspicous activity.

Process

As the lead product designer I worked closely with Coolfire's Principle Software Architect to design a POI management tool. It was split into two applications: a web-based command center, and a mobile app for the field. The web app was used to manage the POI data and create rules and filters for the system. The mobile app was used by field agents responding to threats or activity.

Most of the process involved hearing war stories from the users (crazy stuff) and how they do their jobs. Then we'd workshop ideas and rapidly prototype a solution in Sketch, or in the app. Biv, the Software Architect, was a wizard with Swift and could crank out functional improvements to the app in a few hours. He'd demo the app and get more feedback, then we'd continue iterating the designs.

Some key areas of interest were:

  • Emphasizing faces as much as possible
  • Providing just enough information to users
  • Building trust with the platform by solving real problems
  • Polishig the app with illustrations

Redlyst the compnay happened to need a logo to go with the app, so I put one together in an afternoon. They wanted some distance from competing military-style apps, so I went with lowercase letters that were roundy and approachable.

Outcomes

Digitizing the POI data helped make updating records fast and easy - nobody ever had outdated information regarding potential threats. Our facial recognition technology helped add eyes and ears throughout venues to reduce response times. It also improved the efficiency of the command center agents as they could monitor feeds from multiple events simultaneously.

The bonus features like chat and threat levels were also powerful, making communication more effective and surfacing the right information at the right time.